Last edited by Vugal
Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Old English wic in place-names. found in the catalog.

Old English wic in place-names.

Eilert Ekwall

Old English wic in place-names.

by Eilert Ekwall

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  • 31 Currently reading

Published by Uppsala in Lundequistska Bokhandeln .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Particles,
  • Names, Geographical -- Anglo-Saxon

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesNomina germanica; arkiv för germansk namnforskning, 13
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPE201 E48
    The Physical Object
    Pagination70p.
    Number of Pages70
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20993918M

    English Place Names Probably something -wic, as in Hamwic, the old name for Southampton. Delete. Replies. Reply. Richard Tearle 13 September at We have a Hammerwich just outside Lichfield! To Be a Queen has been long listed for Indie Book of the year ! To Be a Queen. Gelling says ‘most reference books over-estimate the number of topographical settlement-names in which the first element is a personal name rather than a significant word.’ It should be noted that the county volumes produced by the English Place Names Society are primarily intended to make collections of early spellings available.

    The name Wycombe appears to come from the river Wye and the old English word for a wooded valley, combe, but according to the Oxford English Dictionary of Place-Names the name, which was first recorded in as 'Wichama', is more likely to be Old English 'wic' and the plural of Old English 'ham', and probably means 'dwellings'; the name of. The two sets of Old English place names also show an interesting distribution: the place names ending in -ingas and -ham tend to be found in the South East, whereas Old English place names ending in -tun tend to be found further West and North. Scholars have argued that this is because the first set of place names were typically used by the.

    1 The termination "wich" in English place-names often points to ancient salt manufacture - the word " wich" (creek, bay; ich (Wic, Salturic, Wich) probably owed its origin to the springs, which are mentioned in several charters before the Conquest. See James Hall, .   The “sand” of SANDWICH in Kent is precisely that, but the “wich” comes from the Old English word wic, meaning “trading place,” “dwelling,” or “farm.” Put together, it probably.


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Old English wic in place-names by Eilert Ekwall Download PDF EPUB FB2

Old English: settlement, village, dwelling wick, bay Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ekwall, Eilert, Old English wīc in place-names.

Uppsala: A.-B. Lundequistska Bokhandeln, Middle English: wic, wike, wych English: wick, -wich; And indeed we can find plenty of place names in Great Britain which end in -wich or -wick.

And while the former corresponds with the pronunciation used in the TV series, the latter seems equally conceivable.

A "-wich town" is a settlement in Anglo-Saxon England characterised by extensive artisanal activity and trade – an "emporium".The name is derived from the Anglo-Saxon suffix -wīc, signifying "a dwelling or fortified place".

Such settlements were usually coastal and many have left material traces found during excavation. Eilert Ekwall wrote. OE wīc, an early loan-word from Lat. Wick definition: The wick of a candle is the piece of string in it which burns when it is lit. | Meaning, pronunciation, translations and examples.

The place-name 'Wix' is first attested in the Domesday Book ofwhere it appears as appears as Wikes in in the Feet of Fines, and as Wiches in the Curia Regis Rolls in The name is the plural of the Old English 'wic', meaning a dairy farm. St Mary's Church, Wix has a detached belfry, which stands in the churchyard and contains one bell.

Means "crooked hill" from Old English hamel "crooked, mutilated" and dun "hill". This was the name of a town in Leicestershire, England (which no longer exists). Old English wic in place-names.

book the town name became a surname, it was used for several other cities, including ones in Scotland, Canada, Australia and the United States. Common Brittonic (Old English: Brytisċ; Welsh: Brythoneg; Cornish: Brythonek; Breton: Predeneg) was an ancient Celtic language spoken in is also variously known as Old Brittonic, British, and Common or Old the sixth century AD, this language of the Celtic Britons was starting to split into the various Neo-Brittonic languages: Welsh, Cumbric, Cornish, Breton and.

History of English Place-Names: Articles > Names. A Survey of the History of English Place­names. By Scolastica la souriete. The subject of English place­names is a complicated one. There are many factors involved, not the least of which is the waves of conquest England suffered during the period in which most of her place­names were formed.

Many of our English place names are over a thousand years old and give some idea of the landscape and way of life of our Anglo-Saxon predecessors. Castle Bromwich was founded by Anglo-Saxon settlers some centuries before the Norman Conquest, that successful invasion of England by William the Conqueror in Known initially as Bromwich, [ ].

From various English place names that were derived from Old English hæg meaning "enclosure, fence". A famous bearer was American President Rutherford B. Hayes (). A famous bearer was American President Rutherford B. Hayes (). From various English place names derived from Old English hwit "white" and hyll "hill".

WICKHAM English From any of various towns by this name in England, notably in Hampshire. They are derived from Old English wíc "village, town" (of Latin origin) and ham "home, settlement". Kent Place Names Their Origins. This section is dedictated to giving visitors an incite as to what the names of the kent villages and towns really mean.

A Acol is first recorded as Acholt inand the name goes back to the Old English, ac for oak and holt for. Many English place names have -wich at the end, and some have the related -wick or -wych and a few used to have one and since lost it (Jorwic is now called York).

It comes from the Old English wic meaning "place", "dwelling" or "bay", or the related Old Norse. The following is a list of place names often used tautologically, plus the languages from which the non-English name elements have come.

Tautological place names are systematically generated in languages such as English and Russian, where the type of the feature is systematically added to a name regardless of whether it contains it already. The wicks and wiches of London. A scene in Hackney Wick a few years ago.

The Old English word wīc came – probably via Old Frisian and/or other Germanic languages – from the Latin vīcus, meaning a compact settle­ment, neigh­bor­hood or could have been anything from a group of adjacent buildings (such as a single street or a set of farm buildings) to a whole village.

The two sets of Old English place names also show an interesting distribution: the place names ending in -ingas and -ham tend to be found in the South East, whereas Old English place names ending in -tun tend to be found further West and North.

Scholars have argued that this is because the first set of place names were typically used by the. WALDO m English, German, Ancient Germanic Originally a short form of Germanic names containing the element wald meaning "rule".In the Middle Ages this name became the basis for a surname.

Its present use in the English-speaking world is usually in honour of Ralph Waldo Emerson (), an American poet and author who wrote on transcendentalism. wick definition: The definition of wick is the waxy cord that is lit in a candle or oil lamp.

(noun) An example of wick is the white cord in the center of a candle on which the flame burns. The most common termination in Anglo-Saxon place-names is the old tun, the modern ton, as in Sutton, Bolton and so forth; and this word tun does not mean “town” but simply a hedged or fenced dwelling.

The termination –ham is also of extremely frequent occurance (Clapham, Balham, etc.), and this means “home” in its exclusive family sense. This is the shortened version of the Old English East-Seaxe, which meant “East Saxons.”The word has been around since around the 7 th Century, when the East Saxons had a kingdom in the area.

Gloucestershire. This name developed from the Old English Gleawceaster, which was taken from the Celtic word Glevo, meaning “bright place.”The cester is from chester, just like Cheshire.

It was altered by association with Old English Eoforwic meaning "pig farm". This is the name of a city in northern England. This is the name of a city in northern England. The American city and state of New York were named after the Duke of York (James II of England)."salt works, salt pit," Old English wic, apparently a specialized use of the wic that means "dwelling place, town" (see wick (n.2)).

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